Posted tagged ‘snoop dogg’

Justin Bieber in Vibe Magazine’s Death Row Records Cover

January 29, 2014

Today on Facebook, Complex Magazine uploaded a Justin Bieber photo, a Photoshop of a classic Vibe magazine cover.  Right along members of then Death Row records, we see Justin Bieber sporting a gold chain.

Original Vibe cover with Tupac.

Vibe Live from Death Row

Vibe Death Row cover with Justin Bieber.

Justin Bieber Death Row Vibe Cover

 

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Is This List True About The Grammy Awards?

January 29, 2014

Today, I ran across a Four Pins article tackling  The Real Problem With Macklemore. In the comments section, I noticed a post by someone named Fuzz.  Well, I noticed this within Fuzz’s post, a list of  legendary musicians who never won a Grammy.

List of artists who never won a Grammy

Thinking it worthy of a Facebook discussion, I copied and uploaded the list to Facebook.

Also, I asked, “Is this true about The Grammys?”

is this true about the grammys

I shall zoom in on the answers.

Grammys Question

The list rings mostly true.  After nearly four decades, Led Zeppelin finally won a Grammy in 2014.  The rest on the list never won a Grammy.

True enough, an award opens doors and sell more products.  Still, winning doesn’t necessarily prove actual talent. Plus after winning a Grammy, some artists never gain the popularity they once had.  This happened to Terrence Trent D’Arby.  After winning a Grammy in 1988 for Best R&B Vocal (Male),  his popularity nosedived and never recovered.   (As I appreciated his music, I always thought Mr. D’Arby was over-hyped.  Yet, that’s me.

The list proves, seeing the many legends who never receive the award, one should avoid taking The Grammy Awards seriously.  If anything, you and the rest of the world gain the opportunity  to witness some people’s terrible taste in music.

Hip Hop and The N-Word

May 20, 2011

Many nights during my gigs, I am only the black person in the establishment.  Many times during these nights, patrons request hip hop.

I always get requests for Lil Wayne, a dude known for constantly using the n-word.

An old friend stopped by my gig last Wednesday, an African-born white guy named T-Bone.

“You know,” I told him. “I feel funny when I hear these rappers use the n-word.  It ain’t as if I’m offended.  It’s embarrassing.”

“You should be embarrassed,” said T-Bone.

“Listening to it with other black people, I thought nothing of it.  Now, when I hear it among a whole bunch of white people, I think different.”

“Sometimes people need to think about the image they project.”

Years ago, I remember Sean  (a black friend) constantly using the n-word around white people.  When it was just him and me present, I told Sean I didn’t think that was wise.  Months later, an incident involving him and one of our white friends proved me right.

“Me and him don’t hang out no more,” said Sean. “He called me a nigger.”

This was a guy I witnessed Sean using the n-word around.

I believe because he heard Sean using it, our friend thought he had a free pass to use the word himself. (Oh yea, I stopped hanging around that dude too.)

I viewed concert footage of Snoop letting the n-word fly in front of a predominately white audience.

I ain’t gong to front.  I’m guilty myself.  Back in the nineties, I’ve had plays produced in which black characters constantly used the n-word.  I always thought the usage appropriate for the characters, especially juvenile inmate characters.

Now, as I witness white people listening to rappers using the n-word, I wonder if including the usage in my plays was a wise choice.

I think most black rappers don’t even think about a white audience.  Most create music mainly for black consumers.  Yet, if they did thought about a white audience, I wonder if this would curb n-word usage.  I wonder how rappers feel when learning white kids repeat their lyrics word for word, including lyrics using the n-word.

Despite requests, it may be wise for me to quit playing music containing the n-word.  Who knows?  I just might be another uptight forty-something, sounding like someone’s dad instead of sounding like a cool and hip DJ.