Archive for July 2011

Another Chill Tuesday Event

July 30, 2011

Again, I spun chill music at Little Fish, Huge Pond in Sanford, Florida.

During my set, I played an instrumental jazz version of Snoop Dogg’s “Sensual Seduction”.   The Asian beauty in the following pic recognized the song and smiled at me.

Shaun flicking a bird.  Right back at you, bro.

Harry and Toasty behind the bar.  Harry, the guy on the left, is the owner’s son.

Teresa and her dad.  A wonderful performer, Teresa plays guitar and writes her own music.  Her dad appreciated my music choice.

Around 10 or 10:30, I changed the music to rock, dance and hip-hop.  Chill music was never  intended to be played all night.

Folks started playing Ice.  When someone hands you a Smirnoff Ice, you get down on one knee and drink it.

Some people, like the woman on the right, refused getting on down on one knee.

Don’t ask me how Toasty wound up in this position.   I guess alcohol got the best of some people.

Towards the end of the night, there was a toast.

Looking at these photos makes me wish I had started DJing earlier in life.

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Two Nights At The Peacock Room

July 27, 2011

Last Sunday, it was another DJ gig at the Peacock Room.  Again, I was sitting at the end of the counter.  In the bottom right of the photo, one can see part of my equipment.

The two guys in the next photo recognized me for spoken-word.  Fascinated with the female cutie, I photographed them.  Of course, I didn’t let on why I wanted to.

Joe, one of the bartenders, playing chess.  I’ve known Joe for almost six years.

Again, some dude I’ve known years decided to pick a drunken fight.   He claimed the woman he was with wasn’t his girlfriend.  Yet, when he saw the guy in the following photo talking to her, he wanted to fight the man.

The guy refused to get in a conflict.   Then, Joe kicked the fight-starter out.

Clockwise from the top: Brendan, Jen and Andrew Spear.  Andrew is a nationally known artist.  His mural appears in the current “Real World” episodes.

After forgetting my camera, the next night I returned to The Peacock Room to retrieve it.  An art opening was happening.   I ran into to Andrew and Jen.  Behind the three people in the second photo, one would see the artist’s work.

Cake, the artist.  I recognized him from my high school days at Lake Howell, located in Winter Park, Fl.

Happy to have my camera back.  I decided to have some fun.  I’m not a breast man.  Yet, I couldn’t resist photographing this.

Another photo-op I couldn’t resist.

 

With my camera ready, I am anxious for my next gig.

 

Mr. Nocturnal

July 23, 2011

I am writing this very blog at 4 AM Eastern Time.  For years, I have always had problems sleeping at night.  Sometimes, no matter what, I just can’t do it.  Even if I managed to fall asleep at around 10 PM, I wake up around 12 AM and won’t fall asleep until five.


Last Saturday night, a friend and I did some last minute boozing.   Afterwards, I dropped him off at his home.

 
Next, I drove to a local Checkers. In the drive-thru, I ordered two cheeseburgers and a cup of water.  Due to unflattering weight gain, I’m trying to cut down on sodas.

 
Because Checkers don’t have an inside dining area, I decided to eat my meal at one of the circle concrete tables located on the property.  As I ate my meal, I thought about an online article I read, something featuring  Vj Taboo.  I remembered  Taboo mentioning something about DJs being nocturnal.


As I breathed in the night air and looked at my surroundings, the word “nocturnal”  remained stuck on my mind.  It kept making itself known as I looked at the cars passing under the highway’s streetlights.

 
“That ought to be a DJ name,” I told myself. “Mr. Nocturnal.”

 
The next day, I looked the word up online.  I learned my sleepless nights is normal for some people.  We stay up late and sleep late in the morning.  I learned people like me do our best work in the evening time.  I also read that intelligent folks tend to be nocturnal.  I ain’t going to agree or disagree with that statement.  I’ll leave that one alone.

 
Insomnia and nocturnal are two different things.  Insomnia is temporary and can be cured.  Nocturnal behavior can’t be cured.  You’re stuck with it.  I’m not going to complain.  I like the nighttime.   It’s peaceful.


Right now, it’s 4:45 Eastern Time.  In another hour, the few light sprinkles of dawn begins.

 
I think DJing woke-up my natural cycle.

 

Rockin’ An Eighties Hair Metal Party

July 23, 2011

About two weeks ago, I DJed an eighties metal party.   The previous night, Motley Crue performed in Tampa, a two hour drive away from the bar.  So, tonight’s party was intended for those who missed the concert.

Truth be known, this was somewhat out of my comfort zone.   When it comes to spinning one genre all night,  hip-hop would my strong point.   But eighties metal?  And with me being one of three blacks in the place?  Out of my comfort zone but I loved the challenge.

My only complaint involved dudes asking for thrash and punk metal all night.  Again, in order to please everyone, I had to mix the music. Cannibal Corpse mixed in between Twisted Sister and Quiet Riot.   Also, some of the requested music wasn’t even eighties.  In one episode, the bar owner’s son thought it cute to request a current metal group.

Yet, I pulled it off.

Now, I’ll share some photos with you.

Sunny and Candace.  Sunny is the one dressed in metal gear.

Ed.  Impressed with my metal collection, he was a hardcore Iron Maiden fan.

I forget this guy’s name.   Yet, he’s always spinning on top of a bar stool.

Boston Mike and Autumn.   Mike operates a local motorcycle shop.

Hollywood.   I could be wrong.  Yet, I think he was going for the Cheap Trick look.

Kat and friend.  The evening’s host, Kat is the one on the right.

After all the thrash and punk metal, I livened things up with Poison and Van Halen, inspiring Red and Autumn to dance on top of a table.

This was the first time I saw a hula hoop with lights on it.


Matt and Lisa.  Matt tipped with a Pabst Blue Ribbon.  At least, he tipped.

Another couple.  I didn’t get the names.  Yet, the dude’s wardrobe was one of the evening’s highlights.   That is an authentic Members Only jacket he’s wearing, a throwback from the eighties.

Visiting For The Pics

July 22, 2011

Well, ain’t this some shit.  By looking at visitor statistics, I found out some folks are coming to this site for the booty pics.

Oh no, wonderful writing talent has nothing to do with.  Visitors are here for booty.

And mo‘ booty.

Some visit for the bikini pics.

Some look for Latinas.

I hadn’t posted pics of Asian women yet.  Still,  I do possess them.

After my blog about lesbians, some folks come here looking for photos of girls kissing.

I can’t complain too loud.  At least, folks are finding me.  I just hope they read some of the blogs.

 

Witnessing Sade’s Orlando Performance: July 17, 2011

July 19, 2011

Due to my extreme lack of funds, my mother bought my ticket for Sade’s Orlando, Florida concert.  John Legend was the opening act.  Because of ticket prices, I hadn’t planned on attending.  Yet, because she’s a huge Sade fan, my mother wanted to see her.  And she didn’t  plan on going  alone.

When  July 17 arrived, we left my mother’s house at 6:30PM for the 8PM show.  I was the driver.  Knowing Downtown Orlando’s traffic, I figured it wise to leave as soon as possible.

After a twenty minute drive on Interstate 4, the heavy downtown traffic proved me right.  Some parking lots were already filled.  I found a parking garage for ten bucks,  a bargain because the garage exists right across the street from the Amway Arena, the spot hosting Sade’s performance.  Another parking garage was charging twenty.

After parking on the garage’s third floor, we took the elevator down.

As we walked to the Arena, my mother and I noticed the racial make-up of people attending the concert, folks of all races.

“She did say  her fans were mixed,” said my mother.

As we entered the arena, a middle-age black woman checked my mother’s purse and a younger black woman scanned  our tickets, tickets printed off  my mother’s home computer after she purchased them online.

Because I am not a sports fan, I have never been inside the new Amway Arena, the Orlando Magic‘s home.

We took the escalator up to our seating level.  Then, we walked passed the doors to our seats.

Due to fear of heights, it took me awhile to get used to the seating.   I had never been in a stadium as huge as the Amway Arena.  I don’t know how high up we were, but it was too damned high for me.

A few minutes after 8, John Legend and his band came onstage.  I’m not much of a John Legend fan. Yet, his performance impressed me, especially when he sung “Ordinary People”.   He ended his performance with “Green Light”, a hit he recorded with Andre 3000.

People were still entering the arena.

I think a half hour passed between John and Sade.   Then, the lights dimmed and folks began cheering.

First, the opening tunes to her latest single “Soldier of Love” started.   Soon, the Queen of Elegance began walking out of the stage.  Not walking on it.  Walking out of it.  Also, her eight piece band was rising from below the stage.  Of course, the crowd went crazy when they saw Sade.

By this time, the whole stadium was nearly full.

As Sade gracefully walked the stage, a thought came to me.  All these years, I’ve always remembered her as classy.  Unlike some of today’s female stars, I have never seen Sade use sex to sell records.  Instead she always focused on the music.  (Later. Jim Abbot of the Orlando Sentinel would write something similar about this.)

As she performed, either colored lights flashed or film would show.

All day and night, I had been thinking about “Ordinary Love”.  And wouldn’t you know it, she sung it.
Still, there was a special song I was waiting on, a song I recently added to my DJ play list.

I enjoyed her singing “Smooth Operator” and “Is It A Crime”.  During the opening tunes of “Nothing Can Come Between Us”, audience members clapped to the funky beat.  Still, she hadn’t sung my favorite song.

During the performance, a middle-aged black woman dressed in white danced in the aisle.  Twice the usher told her to sit down.

Also, in between songs, folks yelled, “We love you, Sade.”

When Sade sung “Kiss Of Life”, a black woman sitting next me told her friend, “We made Tony during that song.”

Sade rarely spoke.  Yet, when she did, I realized I’ve never heard her speaking voice before.  Singing, she sounds almost American.  Talking, it was obvious she was British.

At the end, she introduced the band.  Then, they all bowed and exited the stage.  She didn’t sing my song, but that was okay.  I was glad to witness one of the most beautiful performances ever.

“She usually does encores,” my mother said.

Folks began leaving.   A few minutes passed and still no Sade.

“I guess no encore,” my mother said.

Then, music came on.  I recognized the song right away.

“Yes!” I said as I clapped.

All the musicians came onstage. Next wearing a red gown, Sade entered and began singing “Cherish The Day”, the song I was waiting on. In the background, a film of a city skyline flickered. A see-through screen began covering the stage as Sade stepped on a platform that began rising her high above the stage. The film still flickered as Sade continued singing.

I said this when I saw Everlast perform “What It’s Like”.  It’s one thing to like a song.  Yet, it’s a whole new experience to witness the actual artist perform it.  Tears dripped down my cheeks.  Truth be known, tears fell throughout the whole show.  But not like this.

Then it was all over.  All night, I attempted holding on to this experience as much as possible.  Yet, the good times sped by too fast anyway.

I’ll never forget this night, the night I saw the Smooth Operator on Sunday, July 17, 2011.

Play Something Cool, DJ

July 13, 2011

For awhile, last Sundays gig cruised positively.  First I warmed up with some rock tunes.  Then, I drifted to some hip-hop. As I did this, I noticed two women dancing near the bar counter.

Now, this is how you have fun.

Speaking of bar counter, again I was sitting at the far right corner of it, typical of my Sunday night gigs at The Peacock. Room.  The Peacock Room exists a five minute drive away from Downtown Orlando, Florida.   August marks my being there for a whole year.

As I focused on people having a good time, a friend of mine walked up to me. At least, I thought he was a friend.

“Virtual DJ,” he went.

The dude’s name was Ray, a white guy who fixes computers.

Virtual DJ is the software I use for gigs.

“I have that,” he said.

“How much you paid for it?” I went.

He ignored my question and stated touching my laptop. Because he ignored my question, I guessed Ray had illegally downloaded the software.

“Go to the sound effects,” he said and pressed my computer to the sound effect page.

“No!” I yelled and changed back to the previous page.

After all the fixing I did with my software, the last thing I needed was someone screwing things up. When I first got it, Virtual DJ automatically altered the BPMs of the songs.  Let’s say the playing song is 95 BPM (beats per minute).  If the next song I choose is 125 BPM, the 95 BPM song automatically speeds up to 125.  And when this happens, Snoop Dogg starts sounding like Alvin and the Chipmunks.   Also, when I first got Virtual DJ, the sound effects automatically came on. Both the BPM and sound effects I had fixed to prevent them from automatically working.   Now, here was Ray fucking with things.

“You’re just now learning the program, aren’t you?” said Ray.

I remained quiet. Actually, I had the program for a year.

Ray left, and I was pissed.  This wasn’t the first time an “expert” played know-it-all with me.  True enough, “experts” of all ethnicities and races worked on my last damned nerves. Still, most of them were white.  Refusing to drop their racial superiority complex, some white people still can’t resist telling black folks what to do.  No wonder many of them have problems with a black president. For once, here’s a black person they can’t boss around.

Having some fun.

I remained focus on keeping the atmosphere positive.   Around 11:30, I placed more focus on hip-hop and dance music. By this time, another woman danced at the bar counter as other folks head nodded to the beats.

Somewhere in the mix, I played Travis Porter’s “Make It Rain”, a hip-hop song.

Again Ray walked up to me.

“Stop playing that ghetto ass music. Play something cool.”

Him saying “ghetto ass music” struck the wrong guitar string with me.

I pointed to the head nodding people.

“Don’t you see those people moving to the music?” I said.

“No, they aren’t,” said Ray.

“Yes, they are.”

“Play something cool.  Play the Cure.  You’re just iTuning it.  You’re not spinning.  I can DJ better than that.”

“Well, do it!”

Ray began leaving. Still, I kept yelling.

“Get your own gig and do it!”

I knew what this was about. I had the gig and he didn’t. And his jealousy was getting the best of him.

Actually, I mix by notes.  Every song contains one main note.  Some notes mix well with others and some don’t.  Virtual DJ tells you the notes.  Sometimes it gets it wrong.  A song saying C could actually be a G song..

Also, I attempt keeping the songs within the five BPM range.  If the current song is 100 BPM, the next song could either be 95 BPM or 105 BPM.

I don’t always follow the methods.  Still, I use it as my guide.

Despite the annoyance, I remained focus on the mix.  By this time, I noticed some bikers nodding to my music.

At the tail end of my gig, I walked outside.  The bikers were getting ready to leave.

“Don’t you play at Little Fish?” one asked.

“Yea,” I said.

As he and I shook hands, we hugged.

I never forgot the night bikers partied to my mix.  Now, they’re recognizing me at other gigs.

Some folks may be better DJs.  Despite that, I still get my props.